Friday, May 15, 2020

Flowers Kissing Air - A Collaborative Art Quilt

"Flowers Kissing Air," 15" x 15", by Therese O'Connor and Pam Geisel, Winter/Spring 2020

Back at the beginning of the year I saw a post from a woman who creates art under the name DuchessFrouFrou, who created a group called CoLaborArt Quilts and was organizing a collaborative quilt project for this year. She picks a theme, sends hand-dyed fabric to each participant, coordinates who the second artist is. Each participant starts one project but finishes a different one. The final size of all of the quilts are 15" x 15" and they are sent to her to arrange to have them exhibited together.


The photo at the top of the post is the finished piece, which I finished. This photo is the part that my collaborator did then sent to me. She also got pink hand-dyed fabric but one of hers had a stripy feel to it.

She did some curved piecing for the background which always impresses me because while I've done a little curved piecing, it seems difficult for me. She also made some cool 3D flowers. But there needed to be something in the center and I felt some pressure to find a way to add an element that added to the piece without being too dominant.

I looked over the sketches and notes that she'd sent and she said that walking in nature was sacred to her. When looking at the piece the pink and white striped part near the bottom reminded me of a river so I thought I'd put a bridge going from the dark foreground to the flowers. But not just any bridge, a red, curved, Japanese-style bridge.


I liked how the red works with the pink and also how the shape of the bridge allows it to go down into the flowers. The bridge is fused and I sewed down the raw edges during the quilting process. I also added some small pink flowers on the left side of the bridge although I didn't make them 3D.


For the quilting I used a meandering free motion stitch in the light blue sky and also over the green and blue leaves since they were fused and I wanted to make sure they stayed in place.


Here are the 3D flowers that Therese made. She also did the hand beading.

You can read about the piece that I started here.

Thursday, May 14, 2020

Have You Heard? The World is Love - A Collaborative Art Quilt

"Have You Heard? The World is Love," 15" x 15" by Pam Geisel & and Vicki Conley, Winter/Spring 2020 

Back at the beginning of the year I saw a post from a woman who creates art under the name DuchessFrouFrou, who created a group called CoLaborArt Quilts and was organizing a collaborative quilt project for this year. She picks a theme, sends hand-dyed fabric to each participant, coordinates who the second artist is. Each participant starts one project but finishes a different one. The final size of all of the quilts are 15" x 15" and they are sent to her to arrange to have them exhibited together.


The photo at the top of the post is the finished piece, which I started. This photo is the part that I did. I got two pieces of hand-dyed fabric and they were both pink. One was a hot pink that had light pink dots on it and the other had parts that were pale and other parts that were almost purple.

The theme was "Sacred" and after some thought, I decided that the earth is sacred but since the fabric was pink I decided to make the earth in the shape of a heart. This was back in February, so I could have also been influenced by Valentine's Day. I intentionally didn't make the heart shape very distinct in case the second artist wanted to go another direction.


I fused the continent shapes to the background and sewed around the raw edges. Because the background was a pale pink I used pieces of the fabric to make the shape of the heart by "blending" random shapes of fabric from light to dark. These are fused but I didn't sew them down since I usually do that during the quilting process and someone else was going to do the quilting.


I did get to name the piece and I used a Beatle's song title with a slight change. The song is "Have You Heard? The Word is Love." My title is "Have You Heard? The World is Love." I think the Beatles would be OK with that interpretation.

You can read about the piece that I finished here.

Tuesday, May 12, 2020

Stained Glass Window Art Quilt

"All Saints' Corpus Christi Stained Glass Window," 38" x 47", made by Pam Geisel, Jan. 2020

Earlier this year I was contacted by the All Saints' Episcopal Church in Corpus Christi, Texas. They were hosting a diocese convocation and wanted a quilted banner based from a photo of one of their stained glass windows.

Working from the photo provided, I removed the horizontal design elements near the bottom of the piece so I would have a place to put their logo.

Then I pulled out batik fabrics that I thought were close in color to the stained glass, which I cut to the correct shape and fused to a white background fabric.


I also fused the letters, which I stitched around the raw edges. I basted the quilt top with batting and a backing fabric and it was time to start quilting.


Luckily I already had a lot of black fusible bias tape which I used to make the "leading" in the window. I fused it to where the different color fabrics met and then sewed down both sides with black thread. The tricky part was the order which it was fused and sewn so I could get as many raw edges underneath other pieces of the bias tape.

I did the leading on the interior wings of the dive first then I covered all of the light purple dove fabric with a purple tulle that had some silver sparkles on it. (You can see them when they're on top of the black bias tape in the photo above). I wasn't sure how well the tulle worked until I stepped back and then I think it really added to the stained glass effect.

The binding was a knife-edge facing and I added two sleeves and a stick with some cording so they would be able to carry the banner during the convocation.

Thursday, April 23, 2020

Christmas in April?

"Happy Little Christmas Trees" Table Topper, 16" x 16", made by Pam Geisel, April 2020

We've been in "quarantine" so long that I'm not sure what day it is, or even what month, although I'm pretty sure it's not December. I've heard of Christmas in July but I don't think it's July, either. I've been told that it's April so we'll go with that.


I recently got this red fabric with the green Christmas trees on it. If you've been following my blog, you might know that fabric sometimes speaks to me. (If not, you can read this short post.) This Christmas fabric was also speaking to me so I took a break from my other work and made this holiday piece. I added the green fabric in the middle to coordinate with the trees. The red piece in the center has gold printed on it.


I call this a "Table Topper" as opposed to a "Table Runner" because for me, a runner needs to be rectangular in shape and not square. I also believe that both table toppers and table runners can go directly on a table or on top of a table cloth. This one would look nice on a green, red, or cream colored table cloth.

Thursday, March 19, 2020

Somewhere Over the Rainbow - Project Quilting

 "Somewhere Over the Rainbow," 6" x 6", made by Pam Geisel for Project Quilting, Season 11, Challenge 6: Vibrant and Vivacious, Mar. 2020 in Yellow Springs, Ohio

Challenge recap for "Vibrant and Vivacious":

Your finished project should be bright.

Using color is not much of a challenge for me, most of my pieces have a lot of color (and the few that don't don't have any colors at all and are just neutrals).

I'd just finished reading a book where one of the central themes was a piano and I was thinking about music notes and realized that if I colored in the lines of a music staff I could use most of the colors of the rainbow.


So I just needed an appropriate song that have five to nine notes and none of them were flats or sharps. Then it came to me: Somewhere Over the Rainbow.

The background, rainbow, and solid notes are raw-edge fusible applique and the note stems and the half notes (the hollow ones) are couched yarn.



To finish it, I wrapped it around a 6" x 6" canvas frame.

More about Somewhere Over the Rainbow

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Click on any of the photos to see larger images.

To read more about Project Quilting, go here.

To see other entries for this challenge, visit the Vibrant and Vivacious page.

Friday, February 21, 2020

Taking Flight - Project Quilting

"Taking Flight," 10" x 10" x 8", made by Pam Geisel for Project Quilting, Season 11, Challenge 4: Birds in the Air, Feb. 2020 in Yellow Springs, Ohio


Challenge recap for "Birds in the Air":

You must either use or reinterpret the traditional block "Birds in the Air" at least once somewhere in this week’s project.

In traditional quilt blocks, birds are often represented with triangles such as "Flying Geese" and "Birds in the Air" and I've made plenty of art quilts with interpretations of both. One in particular was "Sometimes I Dream of Flying" which I made during the second season of Project Quilting where I used "Birds in the Air" blocks across the top and bottom of the pieces.

For the current challenge, I spent some time thinking and drawing sketches but nothing was really jumping out at me. Then it occurred to me to interpret it in three dimensions and not include the negative space (the white parts in the small illustrations above).

For those of you who know me well, I don't really like making three dimensional pieces, even though I've made some including "Inside of a Dog" and "How Does Your Rainbow Grow." I tried to talk myself out of doing this idea but I really couldn't. 


I started auditioning fabrics and the second piece I picked up was this one. I don't know anything about this: who designed it, who printed it, or how I got it. But I did have just enough (the small rectangle at the bottom right is all I have left of it.


To make this piece I sewed the red cord to some triangles cut from heavy fusible interfacing (specifically Pellon Fuse-N-Shape).


Then I fused the fabric triangles to both sides of the interfacing and did a red satin stitch around the edges. The triangle on the left has a longer cord because it goes in the middle and hangs lower than the other four.


I sewed the red cord to the larger triangles which I cut in half so they'd fold better. For the long hanging cord at the top I used a zigzag stitch to attach the cord to the side of one triangle. I did the same for the small triangle that had a longer cord.


Then I abutted the left and right part of the larger triangles leaving a little gap between them, fused the large fabric triangle fabrics to both sides, and did a red satin stitch around the edges.


The final step was to lay the two large triangles on top of each other and sew down the middle to attach them. I did use an iron to persuade them into the shape that I wanted.


More about Taking Flight

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Click on any of the photos to see larger images.

To read more about Project Quilting, go here.

To see other entries for this challenge, visit the Birds in the Air page.

Thursday, February 6, 2020

Rainbow Heart - Project Quilting

"Rainbow Heart," 6" x 6", made by Pam Geisel for Project Quilting, Season 11, Challenge 3: Put a Heart on It, Feb. 2020 in Yellow Springs, Ohio

Challenge recap for "Put a Heart on It":

Your finished piece must have a heart somewhere on the front.

Last Fall I made some 6" x 6" pieces wrapped around canvas that had birds and cats on them and used a rainbow stripe fabric from Timeless Treasures and the Robert Kaufman Effervescence fabric in the "Mardi Gras" colorway. I decided I wanted to use these fabrics for this project.


The trick was to fussy cut the stripe fabric so the stripes would line up when placed next to each other.


The purple fabric in the middle is also a part of the stripe fabric from a different part of the fabric.


There are four buttons: three are a shiny bluish gray and one is a flat purple on top of one of the gray ones. 

More about Rainbow Heart

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Click on any of the photos to see larger images.

To read more about Project Quilting, go here.

To see other entries for this challenge, visit the Put a Heart on It page.