Thursday, March 19, 2020

Somewhere Over the Rainbow - Project Quilting

 "Somewhere Over the Rainbow," 6" x 6", made by Pam Geisel for Project Quilting, Season 11, Challenge 6: Vibrant and Vivacious, Mar. 2020 in Yellow Springs, Ohio

Challenge recap for "Vibrant and Vivacious":

Your finished project should be bright.

Using color is not much of a challenge for me, most of my pieces have a lot of color (and the few that don't don't have any colors at all and are just neutrals).

I'd just finished reading a book where one of the central themes was a piano and I was thinking about music notes and realized that if I colored in the lines of a music staff I could use most of the colors of the rainbow.


So I just needed an appropriate song that have five to nine notes and none of them were flats or sharps. Then it came to me: Somewhere Over the Rainbow.

The background, rainbow, and solid notes are raw-edge fusible applique and the note stems and the half notes (the hollow ones) are couched yarn.



To finish it, I wrapped it around a 6" x 6" canvas frame.

More about Somewhere Over the Rainbow

= = =

Click on any of the photos to see larger images.

To read more about Project Quilting, go here.

To see other entries for this challenge, visit the Vibrant and Vivacious page.

Friday, February 21, 2020

Taking Flight - Project Quilting

"Taking Flight," 10" x 10" x 8", made by Pam Geisel for Project Quilting, Season 11, Challenge 4: Birds in the Air, Feb. 2020 in Yellow Springs, Ohio


Challenge recap for "Birds in the Air":

You must either use or reinterpret the traditional block "Birds in the Air" at least once somewhere in this week’s project.

In traditional quilt blocks, birds are often represented with triangles such as "Flying Geese" and "Birds in the Air" and I've made plenty of art quilts with interpretations of both. One in particular was "Sometimes I Dream of Flying" which I made during the second season of Project Quilting where I used "Birds in the Air" blocks across the top and bottom of the pieces.

For the current challenge, I spent some time thinking and drawing sketches but nothing was really jumping out at me. Then it occurred to me to interpret it in three dimensions and not include the negative space (the white parts in the small illustrations above).

For those of you who know me well, I don't really like making three dimensional pieces, even though I've made some including "Inside of a Dog" and "How Does Your Rainbow Grow." I tried to talk myself out of doing this idea but I really couldn't. 


I started auditioning fabrics and the second piece I picked up was this one. I don't know anything about this: who designed it, who printed it, or how I got it. But I did have just enough (the small rectangle at the bottom right is all I have left of it.


To make this piece I sewed the red cord to some triangles cut from heavy fusible interfacing (specifically Pellon Fuse-N-Shape).


Then I fused the fabric triangles to both sides of the interfacing and did a red satin stitch around the edges. The triangle on the left has a longer cord because it goes in the middle and hangs lower than the other four.


I sewed the red cord to the larger triangles which I cut in half so they'd fold better. For the long hanging cord at the top I used a zigzag stitch to attach the cord to the side of one triangle. I did the same for the small triangle that had a longer cord.


Then I abutted the left and right part of the larger triangles leaving a little gap between them, fused the large fabric triangle fabrics to both sides, and did a red satin stitch around the edges.


The final step was to lay the two large triangles on top of each other and sew down the middle to attach them. I did use an iron to persuade them into the shape that I wanted.


More about Taking Flight

= = =

Click on any of the photos to see larger images.

To read more about Project Quilting, go here.

To see other entries for this challenge, visit the Birds in the Air page.

Thursday, February 6, 2020

Rainbow Heart - Project Quilting

"Rainbow Heart," 6" x 6", made by Pam Geisel for Project Quilting, Season 11, Challenge 3: Put a Heart on It, Feb. 2020 in Yellow Springs, Ohio

Challenge recap for "Put a Heart on It":

Your finished piece must have a heart somewhere on the front.

Last Fall I made some 6" x 6" pieces wrapped around canvas that had birds and cats on them and used a rainbow stripe fabric from Timeless Treasures and the Robert Kaufman Effervescence fabric in the "Mardi Gras" colorway. I decided I wanted to use these fabrics for this project.


The trick was to fussy cut the stripe fabric so the stripes would line up when placed next to each other.


The purple fabric in the middle is also a part of the stripe fabric from a different part of the fabric.


There are four buttons: three are a shiny bluish gray and one is a flat purple on top of one of the gray ones. 

More about Rainbow Heart

= = =

Click on any of the photos to see larger images.

To read more about Project Quilting, go here.

To see other entries for this challenge, visit the Put a Heart on It page.

Saturday, January 25, 2020

There Be Dragons and There Be Mermaids - Project Quilting


"There Be Dragons" and "There Be Mermaids," 6" x 6" each, made by Pam Geisel for Project Quilting, Season 11, Challenge 2: Team Colors, Jan. 2020 in Yellow Springs, Ohio

Challenge recap for "Team Colors":

Your project this week needs to be inspired by the official “team colors” of some organization you support.

While it was made clear in the directions that this didn't have to be a "sports team," that was my first thought. And while I'm not a big sports fan, my husband does like baseball, and fortunately baseball is a sport I can tolerate. And perhaps even enjoy. So much so that we do go to a handful of minor league games every year to our hometown team the Dayton Dragons. Their colors are red and orange.

(As a side note, several years ago I did make small quilts of the stadium, both inside and out, and you can see them here.)

So my first interpretation isn't that much of a stretch, since it's a dragon. I was thinking of the quote "There be Dragons" (or "Here be Dragons") which can mean dangerous or unexplored territories. It is supposedly a saying that was on old maps in areas that hadn't yet been explored to warn people away from those places, although there doesn't appear to be any maps that actually say those words.


Realizing that I had some fabric with fictional ocean maps left over from 2013 Project Quilting Bonus Challenge "Tradition Times Three" where we all purchased a specific fat quarter bundle to create a quilt that used a traditional block and use it in at least three sizes. I made "Red Sky at Night" for this project.


While I was thinking about this background fabric and dragons, planning on using the second team color of orange to make the dragon's fire breath, I realized there was something else that could be found in the ocean, which also had green scales and could possibly have orange/red hair so I made a second quilt that featured a mermaid. (I did recently sell the quilt "Mermaid Haiku," which was also a Project Quilting challenge and perhaps I was missing having a mermaid around.) Also neither my dragon or mermaid are too cute be considered dangerous.


I ironed fusible to the back of the mermaid and dragon pieces then fused them to the background fabric. I based the quilt sandwich, quilted down the raw edges, applied fray check to the raw edges, then wrapped the pieces around 6" x 6" canvases.

More about There Be Dragons and There Be Mermaids

= = =

Click on any of the photos to see larger images.

To read more about Project Quilting, go here.

To see other entries for this challenge, visit the Team Colors page.

Wednesday, January 15, 2020

"Aye, Eye Captain" in Eye Contact Book

 
My art quilt "Aye, Eye Captain" in the book "Eye Contact: Creating a Connection."

I made the art quilt "Aye, Eye Captain" last year as a Project Quilting challenge and also for the Sacred Threads special exhibit "Eye Contact" exhibit "Eye Contact: Creating a Connection."

There was such a great response to the exhibit that most of the pieces are touring the country through December 2021. While they are still getting the venues, information about where you can see the exhibit is on their website. They also have photos and videos of the exhibit.

The book contains images of 248 art quilts all featuring human eyes looking at the viewer. All of the quilts are the same size: 23" wide and 5" tall. It's a small book but very interesting to see all the different interpretations.

You can purchase the book here.

Saturday, January 11, 2020

If 6 Turned Out to be 9 - Project Quilting

"If 6 Turned Out to be 9," 7" x 5", made by Pam Geisel for Project Quilting, Season 11, Challenge 1: Notably Numeric, Jan. 2020 in Yellow Springs, Ohio

Challenge recap for "Notably Numeric":

Your project must feature numbers, counting, or mathematics in its theme or implementation.

We were on vacation when the challenge was posted, so I had several days to think about it before I could work on it. And I had many, many ideas. When I finally started working on it I was going to use the number 6 (or 9) to make eyes or eye glasses. Perhaps I was inspired by the project I made for one of last year's challenges ("Aye, Eye Captain") that also ended up being in the Eye Contact Challenge, as I'd gotten the book from the exhibit for Christmas and had just been looking at it.

Here are just some of the many fonts that I considered. Don't they make great eyes/glasses? Some looked hopeful, while others looked angry.

As I was looking through all of the fonts that I have, I came across one called Jokerman.

I'm not sure where it came from and I don't think I've ever used it before, but it had such a wonderful curl to it that I decided I wanted to use that and not the eyes. (Perhaps another time.)

I traced the six in reverse onto fusible web then fused that to the back of some Robert Kaufman  Effervescence Gradation Rainbow fabric that I had left over from "Breathe - Inhale" and "Breathe - Exhale" that I made last fall.


I fused that to a bright purple Island Batik fabric and sewed the edges down. I basted the quilt to batting and a backing fabric and couched a dusty purple yarn around the design.


I popped it into a frame which can hang either horizontally or vertically (which really makes the 6 obvious).

More about If 6 Turned Out to be 9

= = =

Click on any of the photos to see larger images.

To read more about Project Quilting, go here.

To see other entries for this challenge, visit the Notably Numeric page.

Thursday, January 2, 2020

Custom Quilts made in 2019

It's my annual look back on the custom quilts I made during the year that I haven't shared yet (some were gifts).

Click on the photos to see larger views.

Quilt using shirts, ties, and vests from the recipient's father. 60" x 60"

Baby quilt from a wedding dress. 34" x 44"


(It's hard to photograph white so here are some detail photos)


A set of mini quilts for the seasons. 8" x 6" each on stiff innerfacing.

A quilted stocking to match the other ones the family had. It's been awhile since I've done cross stitch.

Framed fabric mosaic of the Clinton County Courthouse. 14" x 11" framed.

Two more framed pieces, made from a vintage wedding dress. I'm posting the photos that I took at an angle to show off the quilting and the buttons. And because white is hard to photograph. Both are 8" x 10"


I just realized I didn't make any t-shirt quilts in 2019. I've already had a few people inquire about t-shirt quilts for this year so if they happen, I'll share them in the 2020 year in review.